IELTS Listening
 

Listening Test- The recording lasts for about 30 minutes. There are 4 sections & 40 questions in the test. Section 1 and 2 deals with the everyday social situations. The first section is a conversation between two speakers. The second section is a monologue. Section 3 and 4 deals with educational and training situations. The third section is a conversation between up to four people and the fourth section is a monologue.

Types of questions are multiple choice, short answer questions, sentence completion, notes/chart/table completion, labeling a diagram, classification, matching.

You will hear the recording once only so when you listen, you have to work quickly. You are listening for a purpose. Your purpose is to identify what the question requires. The sections get more difficult as you proceed through the recording. You are given time to read the questions before each sections and again to check all your answers at the end. The recording includes timed pauses to allow you to do this. Survey and analyze the questions during the time. You will be given examples of any unfamiliar question types. Read the question, understand it, follow the recording, recognize the answer and write it down. When the recording ends, 10 minutes are allowed to transfer your answers on the answer sheet.

IELTS Reading (General)

Reading Test (General)- It contains 3 sections & 40 questions. It lasts for 60 minutes. Types of questions are multiple choice, short answer questions, sentence completion, notes/chart/table completion, labeling a diagram, classification, matching, choosing suitable paragraph heading from a list, identification of writer’s views, yes, no, not given or true false, not given.

The first section contains texts relevant to basic linguistic survival in English. With tasks mainly concerned with providing factual information. The second section focuses on the training context and involves texts of more complex language. The third section involves reading more extended texts with a more complex structure, but with the emphasis on descriptive and instructive rather than argumentative texts.

Survey the text. Analyze the questions. Read the instructions carefully. Notice which questions are about general themes and which are asking for specific information. Know where to look for specific information and what sort of information is required. Go back to the looking quickly for the information you need. Remember not to try and read every word. Move on to the next question if you could not answer one. Leave enough time to check your answers and to check that you followed the instructions exactly. Finally, practice and practice. There is no substitute for practice.

IELTS Writing (General)

Writing Test (General)- There are two tasks in this test and it last for 60 minutes. In task 1 candidates are asked to write a letter over 150 words requesting information or explaining the situation. The letter may be formal or personal. It is recommended to spend about 20 minutes on task 1. In task 2 candidates are asked to write an essay on common topic. You have 40 minutes to write at least 250 words.

In task 1, purpose of the letter should be clear. Write about all the bullet points in an equal manner.

Separate your paragraphs clearly. Get the right tone (formal or informal) in your letter. Organize your ideas well.

In Task 2, you have to analyze and plan the writing of the essay. Start with introducing topic and establish your point of view on the subject. The subsequent paragraphs will contain an elaboration about topic, while the concluding paragraph will sum up the main point of view.

                                                               IELTS Reading (Academic)

The IELTS Reading test (Academic) lasts for sixty minutes. The question booklet contains three sections. There is a total forty questions in it. Sometimes these come before the reading passage, sometimes after.

There is a wide range of different question types- multiple choice, short answer questions, sentence completion, notes/summary/flow-chart/table completion, labelling a diagram, classification, matching, choosing suitable paragraph heading from a list, identification of a writer’s views/claims- yes, no, not given or true, false, not given.

It is important that you control the time on each reading passage. This is also true of individual questions. You will have to work very quickly. You should not read every word of every passage. When you look at the reading passage, survey the passage and find out what it is about in general terms. If you understand the general subject it will help you later for detailed information. You will know what to look for and where to look for it.   

                                                 IELTS Writing (Academic)

There are two tasks in this test and it last for 60 minutes. In task 1 candidates have to present the information given in a diagram. You may be asked to describe a process, an object or a set of data which may be a graph, a chart or a set of figures in a table. It is recommended to spend about 20 minutes on task 1.

In task 2 candidates are asked to write an essay on common topic. You have 40 minutes to write at least 250 words. You have to analyze and plan the writing of the essay. Start with introducing topic and establish your point of view on the subject. The subsequent paragraphs will contain an elaboration about topic, while the concluding paragraph will sum up the main point of view.

IELTS Speaking

Speaking Test- The test lasts between 11 and 14 minutes. There are 3 parts to the Speaking Test:

  1. Introduction/ interview: around 10 questions in 4 to 5 minutes.

  2. Short presentation: talk for 2 minutes with 1 minute to prepare.

  3. Discussion: around 5 questions in 4 to 5 minutes.

In part 1, examiner asks general questions about your job, family likes and dislikes etc.

In part 2, the candidate is given a task card. The candidate has one minute to prepare a particular topic and can make notes if they wish before speaking. Then the candidate has to speak for two minutes on that topic.

In part 3, the examiner and the candidate engage in a discussion which is linked to the topic in part 2.

The candidate’s score is based on fluency, coherence, lexical resources, grammatical range, accuracy and pronunciation.